Molecular weight testosterone

Another measurement from which molecular weights can be obtained is based on the scattering of light from the molecule. A beam of light falling on a molecule will induce in the molecule a dipole moment which in its turn will radiate. The interference between the radiated beam and the incoming beam produces an angular dependence of the scattered radiation which depends on the molecular weight of the molecule. This occurs whether the molecule is free or in solution. While the theory for this effect is complicated and varies according to the size of the molecule, the general result for molecules whose size is considerably less than that of the wavelength λ of the radiation (less than λ/50) is given by the equation below; I () is the intensity of radiation at angle , I 0 the intensity of the incoming beam, M the molecular weight, and c the concentration in grams per cubic centimeter of the molecule. If the molecules are much larger than λ/50 (about 9 nanometers for visible light), this relationship in this simple form is no longer valid, but the method is still viable with appropriate adjustments to the theory. In fact, it can be used in its extended version even for large aggregates. See Scattering of electromagnetic radiation

Molecular weight testosterone

molecular weight testosterone

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